Spotlight Event: Time Capsule Opening

24 May

by Emma Earnst

This coming Sunday, May 27th, 2012, Charlottesville’s 1962 time capsule, buried during the 200th Anniversary celebrations that year, will be unearthed and opened for public consumption.  Items will be shared with attendees, and then transferred to yours truly (ACHS), for display in our exhibit space.

Below, you will find a video of the burial in 1962.  As you may recall, the exact location of the capsule could not be determined until Tom Hartsell shared this footage, found among his father’s 8mm videos, in August 2011.

Yesterday in Rip Payne

18 May

by Emma Earnst

 

On the day before today in 1968, Rip Payne photographed the lines outside the Paramount Theater in anticipation of The Fox.  As you may recall, we’ve witnessed Rip documenting similar situations before.  I particularly fancy these kinds of images because they stand out from Rip’s typical portraiture work.  They are a portrait of collective society—not just Charlottesville— but of America in the mid-twentieth century.

The Fox, on the other hand, may not be the most obvious representation of typical mid-century American culture (check it out for yourself).

In light of all the brouhaha over Obama’s (and Biden’s) recent declarations on the rights of gay and lesbian Americans, I do find it somewhat amusing that I would come across the one of only about a hundred films with a similar theme from the time period (out of what IMDB estimates being about 4,000 from then till the present).  I have no desire to start a political discussion on the matter, but being a historian, I will point you to a fine treatment of some of the surrounding controversy by Jim Loewen (best-selling author of the Lies My Teacher Told Me series).

Now for the light-hearted stuff:

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Today in Rip Payne

11 May

by Emma Earnst

 

Ready for some Friday frivolity?

On this day in 1965, Rip Payne spent the day at Monticello, capturing a handful of memories of a telephones galore. First, there are a couple of telephone booths set up on the hillside (to me, it resembles the turn of the road going around the house).  Then, we have a group of gentlemen excitedly answering phones in a tent.  One guy really likes his shades—I mean, who wouldn’t?  Next, Rip documents a fantastic 1960s fire-hazard: a slew of cords thrown about and held up in an old tree. And finally, we close with a misplaced, fantastically cheesy shot of two of the telephoners snapping pictures of one another.

I have no idea.  But you’ve got to love those eyesores of telephone booths. Oh yes, technology over preservation won out (but only temporarily).

In some exciting news regarding Monticello and preservation today, you should consider attending Preservation Piedmont’s Monticello to Main Street tour this weekend.  The tour traces Monticello’s African American community as they descended from the mountain and down into the town in the 19th and 20th centuries. Developed in conjunction with the Thomas Jefferson Foundation and the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, it is going to be fantastic. And of course, the 2pm start time still allows you a nice Court Square stroll with us in the morning!

Happy Friday!

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Today in Rip Payne

9 May

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1976, Rip Payne enjoyed the company of some greenery, pretty flowers, and likely a few bugs in a Mrs. Mohney’s garden. This set of images is a bit out of the norm for Rip, who usually focused his work on people, but it is precisely for that reason I thought you may enjoy these.  Besides, those kids from yesterday pretty much gave me an overdose on cutie pie for the day!

I know nothing of Mrs. Mohney, and welcome your input on where this house is located.  Just leave me a note in the comments section!

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Yesterday in Rip Payne

9 May

by Emma Earnst

 

Work got the best of me yesterday, and I ran out of time to share these adorable pictures with you.  So, with apologies, please enjoy them now!

Yesterday in 1974, Rip Payne again spent the day with Mrs. Carter’s kindergarten class— quite possibly some of the cutest kids you have seen! As you may recall, Rip attended the kids’ May Day celebration a week ago, and according to his dating, the party was still raging on today.  Judging by the repeat outfits, however, I would venture guess that his dating is wrong, and these pictures are from the same date, May 1 (interestingly, neither of these are dated the 1st). Nonetheless, I’m allowing you to enjoy these pictures today, strictly because they are just so dern cute!

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Today in Rip Payne

5 May

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1987, Rip Payne spent the day in the air. Apparently hanging out the side of a small plane, he took a series of overhead shots of what he labeled “K-Mart” but are actually better described as “Addition to Seminole Square,” or in some cases, “Views of the Airplane’s Wing.” The plaza, which at the time consisted of only the east side as we now know it (the Giant side), was being expanded to include a north side- which now houses a series of great shops like Pete’s Pet Forum.

Take a look for yourself– compare these images with a current map of the area. You can use this crude diagram as a reference tool (please don’t judge my Photoshop skills):

Some time ago, Peter Hedlund shared this awesome map overlay program—HistoryPin— where anyone can place historic images of places directly onto Google Maps- even street view! I attempted to plop this photo onto the current satellite images of the area, but I’m mostly disappointed. However, the program works much better in street view.  Check out these examples from the local area of the McIntire Building, the JPA bridge, and West Main Street.  Learn more about the uses of HistoryPin on the Encyclopedia Virginia blog.

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Today in Rip Payne

4 May

by Emma Earnst

 

Today in 1968, Rip Payne photographed bride Nancy Kirby with some of her ladies-in-waiting, presumably at her home.

Kirby looks highly uncomfortable at first, but eventually warms up to the camera.

In typical Rip Payne fashion, there are a couple of images in this series which make very little sense. Think of it what you may.

My only question: what’s with everyone wearing a veil?

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And, obviously, best dress I’ve seen so far. Props, girl!