Tag Archives: 1950s

Today in Rip Payne

9 Jul

by Emma Earnst

 

Today in 1955, Rip Payne spent his day as he so often did, photographing a wedding.  To be precise, this was the Duval wedding, which took place at the University Chapel.

Having spent more time in another local Gothic-style church, I find myself constantly wanting to proclaim that Rip was wrong in his identifications of the Chapel vs. Christ Episcopal Church (these are probably the two most popular wedding venues during this time, at least judging from these RP photos), and (almost!) always being wrong.  Consider the following images of the interiors of these two churches:

University Chapel

Christ Episcopal Church

Looking at Rip’s black and white negatives, I admit, at first glance I often mistake one for the other.  Luckily, the stained glass behind the altars differs greatly and provides a good identifier.

Anyhow, Rip Payne spent his day in University Chapel  (note the stained glass) on this day in 1955, celebrating yet another happy Charlottesville nuptial:

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Today in Rip Payne

1 May

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1952, Rip Payne photographed the McIntire May Day celebrations. Having grown up in Germany, May Day brings back fantastic childhood memories of the celebrations we would delight in overseas. Here in Charlottesville, they found a way to incorporate our own American symbols into the festival.

I hope you enjoy these kid pics as much as I have!

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Today in Rip Payne

27 Mar
by Emma Earnst
 

Today in 1960, Rip Payne attended a demonstration flight by the Albemarle Soaring Club at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.  According to a national Soaring Club publication,

A new group known as the Albemarle Soaring Club is starting operations this spring at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport, Charlottesville, Virginia.  The Club members, about 5, bought two L-K’s in November of 1958 and spent the winter, spring, and summer rebuilding one of them… Finally, in March of 1960 a beautiful weekend came and 10 aero-tows were made.  The longest flight lasted 1 hour and 1 minute.  On this weekend, many new faces were introduced to the growing soaring movement in the U.S.A.

The Albemarle Soaring Club was especially significant, as it sharply differed from the images of air travel that were shown in the media at this time.  In October 1959, Charlottesville citizens were rocked when a Piedmont Airlines plane crashed in the area, killing all but one of its passengers.  The Soaring Club’s special weekend, just a few months after the crash, served to remind their friends that flying is still fun, and in spite of dangers, it can be a breathtaking leisure activity.

Or, they were just a bunch of crazy thrill-seekers…

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