Tag Archives: 1960s

Today in Rip Payne

13 Jul

by Emma Earnst

 

Today in 1964, Rip Payne documented Bradley Peyton Motors, a locally owned Pontiac-Cadillac dealership.  Peyton Motors was located on West Main Street, on the lot where the Red Roof Inn now sits.  The dealership opened in 1947, and existed for nearly twenty years until in 1967 the hotel (at this time, a Howard Johnson,) replaced it.  Prior to being the car dealership, the land had been host to a number of businesses, including a gas station, dry cleaners, and miniature golf course.  For more fun facts about the development of the Corner blocks, check out this great spread by Coy Barefoot in the University of Virginia Magazine archives.

 

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Today in Rip Payne

10 Jul

by Emma Earnst

 

Today’s Rip Payne comes from an unknown date in July 1967, and depicts Old Fashion Day at what was a relatively new Barracks Road Shopping Center.

Bunny trail time: Something tells me our friend Rip wasn’t a fan of the July heat.  To date, the distribution of pictures per month falls heavily on spring (March to May) and fall (September to November).  Admittedly, the cool breezes and beautiful colors of those seasons seem far more attractive than the scorched earth and overheated public of summer—especially to someone whose life work is to capture beauty.  Nonetheless, I’m happy to report that summer is doing far better than winter.  In terms of number of Rip Payne photographs.  Because, as you know, that’s what really matters.

Anyways, one of the (few) reasons Rip ventured out in the heat in July 1967 (so far I only have one other photo series from this month and year) was to shoot a group of individuals who dressed up in old-fashioned garb and shopped.  Well, rather, they dressed up so that others would shop.  That’s right—for at least two years in a row, a group of Barracks Road employees put on the longest dresses and warmest wool suits they find and paraded around in the dreaded heat, all in the name of sales.  Needless to say, this event didn’t last through to the present.  Hmm, I wonder why?

P.S. Can you guess which character is my favorite?

 

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Answer: Duh, its the woman with awesome specs smoking a pipe.

Today in Rip Payne

31 May

by Emma Earnst

 

On this day in 1960, Rip Payne accompanied a class on a field trip to a local press (Daily Progress?).  The group explored the workings of the press’s Linotype machine, the blocking for the press, and finally, the end result—a newspaper.

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Yesterday in Rip Payne

18 May

by Emma Earnst

 

On the day before today in 1968, Rip Payne photographed the lines outside the Paramount Theater in anticipation of The Fox.  As you may recall, we’ve witnessed Rip documenting similar situations before.  I particularly fancy these kinds of images because they stand out from Rip’s typical portraiture work.  They are a portrait of collective society—not just Charlottesville— but of America in the mid-twentieth century.

The Fox, on the other hand, may not be the most obvious representation of typical mid-century American culture (check it out for yourself).

In light of all the brouhaha over Obama’s (and Biden’s) recent declarations on the rights of gay and lesbian Americans, I do find it somewhat amusing that I would come across the one of only about a hundred films with a similar theme from the time period (out of what IMDB estimates being about 4,000 from then till the present).  I have no desire to start a political discussion on the matter, but being a historian, I will point you to a fine treatment of some of the surrounding controversy by Jim Loewen (best-selling author of the Lies My Teacher Told Me series).

Now for the light-hearted stuff:

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Today in Rip Payne

11 May

by Emma Earnst

 

Ready for some Friday frivolity?

On this day in 1965, Rip Payne spent the day at Monticello, capturing a handful of memories of a telephones galore. First, there are a couple of telephone booths set up on the hillside (to me, it resembles the turn of the road going around the house).  Then, we have a group of gentlemen excitedly answering phones in a tent.  One guy really likes his shades—I mean, who wouldn’t?  Next, Rip documents a fantastic 1960s fire-hazard: a slew of cords thrown about and held up in an old tree. And finally, we close with a misplaced, fantastically cheesy shot of two of the telephoners snapping pictures of one another.

I have no idea.  But you’ve got to love those eyesores of telephone booths. Oh yes, technology over preservation won out (but only temporarily).

In some exciting news regarding Monticello and preservation today, you should consider attending Preservation Piedmont’s Monticello to Main Street tour this weekend.  The tour traces Monticello’s African American community as they descended from the mountain and down into the town in the 19th and 20th centuries. Developed in conjunction with the Thomas Jefferson Foundation and the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, it is going to be fantastic. And of course, the 2pm start time still allows you a nice Court Square stroll with us in the morning!

Happy Friday!

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Today in Rip Payne

3 May

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1965, Rip Payne documented the dedication of the new General Electric building.  In a uniquely GE way, rather than cut a ribbon or crack open a bottle of champagne, the big wigs lined up and turned on some lights!  WINA offered some sponsorship (microphones), and the tuxedo-clad fellows then dined banquet style. Since the 1980s, GE’s Intelligent Platforms (their computer technology segment) has been headquartered out of Charlottesville (they are located wayyy up 29 North), but not the same building that these men dedicated back in ’65.

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Then, having now fully entered wedding season, Rip Payne spent this day in 1986 photographing Robin Hanger’s big day. And lets just say, there’s no doubting we’re in the 80’s here, kids.  We’re talking big hair, a bigger veil, puffy sleeves, and the tannest skin you’ve ever seen. It is fantastic. I know you will enjoy these!

By the way, Robin’s wedding, like my own upcoming nuptials will, took place in Christ Episcopal Church. But they let her put down a white runner. Hmmm…

44 days!

Today in Rip Payne

25 Apr

by Emma Earnst

 

On this day in 1968, Rip Payne had a ball!

Well, a golf ball, that is.

He spent the day at THE putt putt palace on Rio Road, snapping shots of the latest crowned Southeastern Putt Putt Queen.

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Didn’t know such a thing existed?  Don’t be foolish.  Back in the 1960s, even South Africa had a Putt Putt Queen!

It is worth mentioning that in the late 1960s, the putt putt business had really gone a tad overboard.  In addition to this full-blown international beauty contest, they published a regular newsletter, established a motto (“America’s Newest Professional Sport”) and even enlisted a chaplain (perhaps to cut down on the cursing when those *&@$ed windmills ate your ball?).

The appearance of “Miss Putt Putt,” as Rip named her in 1968, may have been a recurrence of the previous year’s PPA Tournament as part of the Charlottesville Dogwood Festival.  This 1967 tournament included a $1000 prize, a parade of national beauty queens, and an appearance by Ken Boy, the 1966 “Putter of the Year.”

Built by Lloyd “L.F.” Woods, the Rio Hill course still operates today. Kinda makes you want to go play putt putt now, doesn’t it?!