Tag Archives: airplane

Today in Rip Payne

18 Apr
by Emma Earnst
 

On this day in 1946, Rip Payne took in a ball game at Lambeth Field.  The stadium, constructed in 1911 by Robert E. Lee Taylor, was

intended to be the ‘finest athletic stadium in the South and one that compares very favorably with the stadiums at Syracuse and Harvard.’

Named in honor of Dr. William A. Lambeth, the director of athletics at the time, it served as the football stadium until 1931, when Scott Stadium was constructed.  The field continued to serve other sports, including baseball, for many years hence.  In addition to being the premier athletic field of its day, Lambeth also became well-known for hosting, perhaps, one of the first flights to which Charlottesville bore witness (in 1912).

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In researching this entry, I came across the following discussion on cvillenews.com regarding Charlottesville businesses (including Keller & George, whose sponsorship is advocated in Payne’s photos), the city/county border, and blogging ethics.  Which has still left me to wonder… what is the oldest Cville business?
 
In other news, George Reed, who serves as the managing director of Monticello Media (which, consequently, owns WCHV, the radio group picture above) recently wrote an article discussing the Keller Radio Talent Institute at Appalachian State University.  App State, in turn, is the home to History Matters, a historical publication in which my undergraduate thesis was published. Whoa… that’s a lot of coincidences for one day.
 
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Today in Rip Payne

27 Mar
by Emma Earnst
 

Today in 1960, Rip Payne attended a demonstration flight by the Albemarle Soaring Club at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.  According to a national Soaring Club publication,

A new group known as the Albemarle Soaring Club is starting operations this spring at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport, Charlottesville, Virginia.  The Club members, about 5, bought two L-K’s in November of 1958 and spent the winter, spring, and summer rebuilding one of them… Finally, in March of 1960 a beautiful weekend came and 10 aero-tows were made.  The longest flight lasted 1 hour and 1 minute.  On this weekend, many new faces were introduced to the growing soaring movement in the U.S.A.

The Albemarle Soaring Club was especially significant, as it sharply differed from the images of air travel that were shown in the media at this time.  In October 1959, Charlottesville citizens were rocked when a Piedmont Airlines plane crashed in the area, killing all but one of its passengers.  The Soaring Club’s special weekend, just a few months after the crash, served to remind their friends that flying is still fun, and in spite of dangers, it can be a breathtaking leisure activity.

Or, they were just a bunch of crazy thrill-seekers…

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