Tag Archives: fashion

Today in Rip Payne

11 Jul

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1970, Rip Payne photographed the Weakly wedding.  The happy pair was smart and opted for an indoor wedding, to which Rip agreed.  As I remarked yesterday, it seems Rip was not a fan of the July heat, and 1970 is no exception to this.  We only have two other documented cases of him venturing out—one of which was another wedding, and the other being a photo shoot with the “Tupperware Girls” (just you wait!).  At least Rip has his priorities straight.

Here’s a couple quick highlights on these:

  1. Bursts of color: Yellow and green? You have my heart dear Weakly.  Having just returned from my own honeymoon in Jamaica, I’ve been going through withdrawal of many things: relaxation time, beach, and waves, among other things.  I was slightly prepared for these things, though.  Being a beach bum at heart, I know that adjusting back to life in the mountains can be hard after any time near surf and sand. The thing that has shocked me the most was the complete difference in COLOR between Jamaica and Virginia.  I’m talking bright blue ocean and pure white sand, brilliant flora in golden yellows, burstingly bright corals and reds, and the most purely green foliage.  And then we come back to a scorched earth and a few variations on red-brown in the Jeffersonian architecture of Charlottesville.  Blech!  So, Weakly and Payne, thank you for bringing color back to me, if only in pictures!
  2. Oftentimes in these, the brides look, well, a little terrified (at least pre-ceremony).  Understandable.  Our Weakly bride, though, looks positively radiant.

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Today in Rip Payne

10 Jul

by Emma Earnst

 

Today’s Rip Payne comes from an unknown date in July 1967, and depicts Old Fashion Day at what was a relatively new Barracks Road Shopping Center.

Bunny trail time: Something tells me our friend Rip wasn’t a fan of the July heat.  To date, the distribution of pictures per month falls heavily on spring (March to May) and fall (September to November).  Admittedly, the cool breezes and beautiful colors of those seasons seem far more attractive than the scorched earth and overheated public of summer—especially to someone whose life work is to capture beauty.  Nonetheless, I’m happy to report that summer is doing far better than winter.  In terms of number of Rip Payne photographs.  Because, as you know, that’s what really matters.

Anyways, one of the (few) reasons Rip ventured out in the heat in July 1967 (so far I only have one other photo series from this month and year) was to shoot a group of individuals who dressed up in old-fashioned garb and shopped.  Well, rather, they dressed up so that others would shop.  That’s right—for at least two years in a row, a group of Barracks Road employees put on the longest dresses and warmest wool suits they find and paraded around in the dreaded heat, all in the name of sales.  Needless to say, this event didn’t last through to the present.  Hmm, I wonder why?

P.S. Can you guess which character is my favorite?

 

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Answer: Duh, its the woman with awesome specs smoking a pipe.

Today in Rip Payne

9 Jul

by Emma Earnst

 

Today in 1955, Rip Payne spent his day as he so often did, photographing a wedding.  To be precise, this was the Duval wedding, which took place at the University Chapel.

Having spent more time in another local Gothic-style church, I find myself constantly wanting to proclaim that Rip was wrong in his identifications of the Chapel vs. Christ Episcopal Church (these are probably the two most popular wedding venues during this time, at least judging from these RP photos), and (almost!) always being wrong.  Consider the following images of the interiors of these two churches:

University Chapel

Christ Episcopal Church

Looking at Rip’s black and white negatives, I admit, at first glance I often mistake one for the other.  Luckily, the stained glass behind the altars differs greatly and provides a good identifier.

Anyhow, Rip Payne spent his day in University Chapel  (note the stained glass) on this day in 1955, celebrating yet another happy Charlottesville nuptial:

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Today in Rip Payne

30 May

by Emma Earnst

 

On this day in 1970, Rip Payne spent the day at Christ Episcopal Church, photographing the Rumble wedding (as he named it).  As I’m going to be married there in just two and half weeks myself, you know I couldn’t resist!

I’ll let you enjoy after a few quick observations:

  1. Seafoam green is back.  That only took like 42 years… sheesh.
  2. I am not sure I’ll ever get used to bridesmaids wearing veils.
  3. Is this not one of the most unhappy-looking brides you have ever seen?  I don’t want to judge, because I myself have a face that never cooperates in pictures.  But, here I am, judging nonetheless.  Time to go practice in the mirror, me!
  4. Awesome choice of costume change, and even better car decorating.

Enjoy!

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Today in Rip Payne

4 May

by Emma Earnst

 

Today in 1968, Rip Payne photographed bride Nancy Kirby with some of her ladies-in-waiting, presumably at her home.

Kirby looks highly uncomfortable at first, but eventually warms up to the camera.

In typical Rip Payne fashion, there are a couple of images in this series which make very little sense. Think of it what you may.

My only question: what’s with everyone wearing a veil?

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And, obviously, best dress I’ve seen so far. Props, girl!

Today in Rip Payne

3 May

by Emma Earnst

On this day in 1965, Rip Payne documented the dedication of the new General Electric building.  In a uniquely GE way, rather than cut a ribbon or crack open a bottle of champagne, the big wigs lined up and turned on some lights!  WINA offered some sponsorship (microphones), and the tuxedo-clad fellows then dined banquet style. Since the 1980s, GE’s Intelligent Platforms (their computer technology segment) has been headquartered out of Charlottesville (they are located wayyy up 29 North), but not the same building that these men dedicated back in ’65.

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Then, having now fully entered wedding season, Rip Payne spent this day in 1986 photographing Robin Hanger’s big day. And lets just say, there’s no doubting we’re in the 80’s here, kids.  We’re talking big hair, a bigger veil, puffy sleeves, and the tannest skin you’ve ever seen. It is fantastic. I know you will enjoy these!

By the way, Robin’s wedding, like my own upcoming nuptials will, took place in Christ Episcopal Church. But they let her put down a white runner. Hmmm…

44 days!

Today in Rip Payne

30 Apr

by Emma Earnst

 

On this day in 1960, Rip Payne photographed a book signing and talk in the old Barrett Reading Room at UVA (how humanities).  The Barrett Reading Room, named in honor of Clifton Waller Barrett was established in the 1960s on the second floor of Alderman Library.* According to UVA’s Board of Visitors minutes, Barrett was “an alumnus and noted bibliophile.”  What a lovely characterization!  (If only every such person got a reading room named after them.) When the Small Special Collections Library opened in the early 2000s, the Barrett Room (in name only) moved to the new building.  The original physical room began renovations to become an East Asian reading room instead.**

In addition to having a nifty little story behind these pictures, they are pretty cool all on their own.  I would just like to highlight a few fashion notes:

  1. Men were wearing super-cool black-rimmed glasses back then, too. Guess it only took 50+ years for that to come back into style.
  2. Mink was acceptable attire for book signings in the near-basement of a library.  Seems a little over-board to me, but I’ll try it out at our next signing (faux fur, of course).
  3. Can we please talk about that gorgeous polka dot dress? Or better yet, how about that Jackie-O-style jacket on the standout brunette (above)? I swoon.

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*Question: With whom does Barrett share an awesome/confusing middle name?

Answer: William Waller Hening, editor of the Statutes at Large, the collection of all Virginia laws from 1619 to his present.  Check out a big new collection of them over in the Encyclopedia Virginia’s primary resources section.  Yours truly may have had a small part in that!

Further Reading:

Susan Tyler Hitchcock, Buried treasure: UVA’s Special Collections get a new homeThe Hook, March 3, 2005.