Tag Archives: party

Today in Rip Payne

1 Feb

I thought I’d do something a little different today, so we are going to play a little game of “Choose Your Own Adventure.”  In addition to being one of the coolest things to play/read as a child, this allows me to potentially escape the fate of running into another wrecked train (SPOILER ALERT!) after writing a Rip Payne post about it.  More on that later…

So for those of you who have never played, here’s the rules:

I give you two options and you pick between them, then get served the Rip Payne you deserve for picking that.  This is going to be a lot clearer than the typical Choose Your Own Adventure scenario wherein, without doubt, I always ended up getting killed or in some other terrible disaster.

Here’s your scenario:

Its almost noon o’clock, and you get to read an awesome Rip Payne blog post.  If you are having a rough day, and would like a random happy picture to cheer you up, please see Chapter 1 below.  If you are having a good day, and feel ready to take on the world, good, bad, ugly, and all, please scroll down to the bottom the page (Chapter 2).  You will still get some happiness on the way.  If you are having such a bad day that only other people’s mistakes//random acts of destruction could possibly make you feel happy, please scroll down to Chapter 2.  Don’t even bother looking at Chapter 1.

Chapter 1

Mrs. Dan Townsend's Birthday Cake, 1945

Chapter 2

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

Train Wreck at Orange, VA, 1965

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Today in Rip Payne

26 Jan

Today in 1946, Rip Payne attended St. Anne’s.  Scratch that.  Rip Payne attended a dance at St. Anne’s.  To photograph, of course…

St. Anne’s, one of the two obvious predecessors to today’s St. Anne’s-Belfield, was a long-standing private school in Charlottesville, tracing it roots back to the Albemarle Female Institute, which opened in 1856.  At this time of this photograph, the school was (still) an all-girls school, though the girls were obviously allowed to bring male guests to their social functions.  Almost thirty years after this Payne photo school, St. Anne’s officially united with the Belfield School (in 1975), opening its doors to males as well as females for the first time.  The other half of the namesake, Belfield, was descendant from Miss Nancy Gordon’s primary school, established in 1911.

If you missed ACHS’ exhibit last year in honor of the 100 year anniversary of the St.Anne’s-Belfield School, produced by the school’s fantabulous historian, Kay Butterfield, do stop by our offices or those at St. Anne’s to pick up Kay’s book, Teach Them Diligently, a far more detailed and picturesque history of the school.

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Today in Rip Payne

24 Jan

Today in 1960, Rip Payne headed over to the 22947 to shoot the first of two series of photos of the Keswick Post Office.  According to an October 1965 article in the Daily Progress, the area known presently and contemporarily (yes, I made up that word) as Keswick had been served by a total of four post office names and locations since its establishment on July 21, 1824.  This first post office was located in what was then known as Everettsville , a small but bustling center at an intersection of Three Notch’d Road and the present county road 744 (Hacktown Road).  The town’s claim to fame dates back to 1825, when Lafayette was met by a cavalcade here as he was en route to visit Jefferson at Monticello.

Following transfers to Keswick Depot on February 8, 1849, and then to Henry W. Jackson’s store, in the 1930s the Post Office was moved to its present location on Route 22, pictured below.  At the time of these photographs, the building still had signage for James T. Morris Mechanics.  Today, the facade looks a little different.  Additionally, as you will notice, this was no ordinary trip to the post office.  The afternoon instead welcomed visitors to a small social, where one could sip a beverage while lounging near the stamp rack, or even enjoy a nice stroll around the garden outside.

 

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RP  2351–RP 2384, Rip Payne Collection, Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society.